Using Enablement to give Sellers more time to sell

Siew Hoon Goh is the Senior Director, Sales Excellence and Operations at Microsoft.  She comes to Enablement from a Finance background which provides her with a fantastic perspective of how to evaluate and articulate business value.  Her focus at Microsoft?  Giving sellers more time to sell.

In this session, Siew Hoon, Josie Marshburn, and The Collaborator will explore her effort and how they have led to an increase in the amount of time spent by sellers actually selling.

Consider:

1️⃣ Consolidating tools and information so that your customer facing teams can find what they need when they need it, and spend less time away from customers.

2️⃣ Manage your calendars/schedules with intention to ensure you are focused on the highest priorities (time with customers, time for yourself too).

And as always, so much more. Give a listen.

Audio Transcript

The Collaborator
Talk a little bit because Sue, who you’ll meet in a second was like, let’s

Unknown Speaker
go.

The Collaborator
She’s seem so quiet right now. But she’s actually got a lot of hidden energy. So be aware there’s going to be some cool stuff coming. So maybe we’ll start with this Sue, can you introduce yourself who you are, where you work? What do you do? And then I’m going to talk to my old friend Josie. And I don’t mean old age wise, Josie. I mean,

Siew Hoon Goh
in comparison, I might be the older one here. So I might be though I know. So let’s let’s not compete over that. Hey, everyone. So glad to be here today. And john. So great to see you again. And thanks for you know, the invitation to be on this podcast. So first of all, my name is su Hoon, go. I work in Microsoft in the SMC business, leading the sales excellence and operations team. So in case you’re wondering, what is SMC you know, we love acronyms in Microsoft. And so it represents the small, medium and corporate customer segments. So basically, kind of really anything that’s non enterprise, right? And so our business is all about skill, right? How do we grow our business at scale, we’re both account manage business in our world, as well as manage business. And basically, if you think about this is supported by our digital sales sellers, field sellers. And you know, a part of our business as well is driven to our partner ecosystem.

The Collaborator
Oh, my God, such a huge universe and cool stuff you’re responsible for, you know, just helping out there. So Josie, my friend, take a moment and introduce yourself.

Josie Marshburn
Thank you, I would love to. First of all, I’m so excited to be on here with both you and Sue. So thanks for having me

Unknown Speaker
on.

Josie Marshburn
So first off, I am the founder and CEO of a company called sales enablement benchmark. We do advisory work either around helping the organization improve sales enablement, or put it in for the first time. Or if you’re having problems with sales, we do a lot of diagnostics and improvement around sales performance as well. So that’s what I do today. Previously, I’ve spent my entire career in technology sales. And so I’m so excited to be here and talk about anything that you guys want to talk about today.

The Collaborator
All right, we’re gonna have some fun here.

Siew Hoon Goh
I sorry, like john, maybe add on, I met Josie in the webinar that we did on digital Sally. And I was so impressed by her. And I was like, I have to get to know Josie as a friend. She’s got so much thing. I’m trying to kind of, you know, grab her brain knowledge. And then she introduced me to you and I’m like, Oh, my God, like, I love you have

The Collaborator
to apologize for that later. She’ll apologize to you for that.

Siew Hoon Goh
Maybe? Yeah, I will give her some feedback about Yeah,

The Collaborator
garrison. Cuz that’s she didn’t do you right there. Hey, Sue, before we get into all the cool stuff you’re doing, I have to ask you. Yeah, you told me and i and i double check. You came from finance. I rarely hear anybody coming from finance into enablement. Tell us tell us a little bit about that.

Siew Hoon Goh
Like what happened? Like?

The Collaborator
What prompted you to give it a try? And how has enablement shaped? Your view and your approach?

Siew Hoon Goh
Yeah. Finally, john, this is probably kind of, you know, accidental, kind of, you know, I landed in enablement, right. So, for most of my career, even in Microsoft, and even before Microsoft, like, it’s always been in finance, I actually spent, you know, 16 years of my Microsoft career in finance. And so, you know, it’s I never taught like, one day, I’ll probably move on finance and get into the business. Because in finance, I work so closely with the business every day, right? And so, you know, I’ve always a natural affinity, to want to know more about the business. And so an opportunity came up, and one of my business partners, you know, kind of, like, you know, talk to me about the opportunity, you know, and then I thought about it, and I was like, You know what, it sounds so cool, why would I you know, take the leap and the reeds to go learn about something new. Right. Like, and I so one of the questions I did have, when I was considering the role was, are there other great, you know, transferable skills I could have, from finance into enablement, right. And on the surface, it might not look like there is a lot in common between finance and enablement. But you know, what, in now that I’ve done this role for a couple of years, I find like, you know, a couple of my finance skill set is so helpful in the current role as far as one, you know, leveraging analytics, right? Like, you know, that’s called to finance, but also in enablement, right, looking and using analytics to help drive our business, you know, using data to make objective decisions, like it’s just core part of enablement as well, right. And it has so many transferable soft skills. As well, whether it’s collaboration skills, influencing skills, you know, people leadership skills I have from finance. They are also transferable, right. So there is a big, you know, kind of a lot of transferable stuff I could have. And by the way, I still get to work with our finance team almost on a daily basis. So, you know, my previous connection with them is definitely helpful, right? Even though if you ask them today, they will say I probably move to the dark side.

Unknown Speaker
I’m sure they would say,

Siew Hoon Goh
especially when I knock on their door to ask for investments, right. So yeah, so they kind of say, Wow, how quickly you have changed, you know, like,

The Collaborator
you would have said no to this Zoo now. That’s awesome. I love it. Because people, I mean, I don’t know about you, josey. But I rarely, I don’t think I’ve ever talked to anybody who’s come to enablement from finance before, so many intriguing backgrounds. Yeah, you know, all over the place with finances unique, and I agree with you such incredible experiences and skills you bring to the role, but I wouldn’t have thought about it before we chatted to them. So I really wouldn’t have

Siew Hoon Goh
interesting. Coming from sorry, Jesse. Yeah,

Josie Marshburn
I’m sorry. I think the closest role we have to finance john, is we have people that come in from sales, sales operations, right? So they’re sort of kind of looking at things from the perspective that you do. But I don’t think they’re digging into the numbers the way you are.

The Collaborator
A great, great. were you gonna say something more? No,

Siew Hoon Goh
no, no, I was, I was gonna say that I you know, that there’s some great skills I bring, but I also like, you know, kind of, there’s also so much to learn, right, like not having kind of the sales, you know, background as well. So it’s like, you know, in a way, a great balance of like bringing something but also like just, you know, a whole wide world for me to learn, you know, in the sales business itself. Yeah.

The Collaborator
I love that. No, before we dive into, you know, what, some of the incredible work you’ve done, how big is your current enablement team? If I can ask, and you can be general, if you don’t want to go into details, but you know, how big is it? And how many people are you supporting with that team today?

Siew Hoon Goh
Yeah, yeah, definitely. So, john, I have a fantastic team of roughly about 50 people, globally, you know, across the world, and a huge shout out to them. You know, I’m super fortunate and grateful, you know, to have such a fantastic team, you know, working together, we support roughly a couple of 1000s of sellers and managers in our SMC business. You know, and really kind of, you know, people always ask me about, like, Oh, you know, what does your team really do? Right? Because, in a way that is in, in, in, in our world, we call it sales excellence and operations, it can be sales enablement, it can be sales operations, so many names. Yeah, so many names, right. And probably different people in different companies do it slightly differently as well. But really, at the end of the day, you know, the mission for you know, my team is to be able to help us celebrate growth for our business. And, you know, how can we help improve customer and seller experience as well true? You know, I would say like being, you know, super good in execution in our process, our tools, our operations. And so the way I’ve kind of structured My team is into a couple of functions, right? It started, it starts from planning, all the way about how we think about our customer segmentation, how do we think about our compensation plan? And everything right? And then basically, how we think about lending our strategy and priorities, what kind of skill sets our sellers need, right? What readiness, you know, do they need. And then I have a group of sales excellence, folks who, you know, kind of as the CEO to our sales leader in managing their business. And then I have group who kind of, you know, looks at r&b and analytics, as well as all of the tools and digital capabilities, which is particularly important in our business, right being a skilled business. Yeah.

Josie Marshburn
john king, do you mind if I jump in now?

Unknown Speaker
Please don’t say Do you mind? just he just jumped in? I wrote.

Josie Marshburn
You mentioned something that really intrigues me. And it is around the skill set and the readiness for the team. So talk to me a little bit about that is, are there tools that you guys are using to assess skill set? Are there competencies that you’re trying to align to? Like, how, how sophisticated how mature? Are you guys in that area?

Siew Hoon Goh
Yeah, so great question, Chelsea. I think this is technically super Top of Mind, right? Because as we think about the different skill set, or what we need to sell in a cloud world versus kind of, you know, your traditional kind of like selling a license type, for example, it’s super different skill sets, right? So in our readiness plan, we focus on a couple of kind of different type of scaling, right, technical scaling has probably become super important for us. You know, in this new cloud, we’re right like and so a big focus for us in the last I would say two years. Last year, and this year has been really ramping up on the technical part. So we’ve, we’ve built in some certification for our sellers and everything right. And so that’s a big one. And then and then, you know, I would say, sales skills is another key one as well, that we continuously want to make sure we refresh and update the seal skills, right how to prospect and hand, how do you do a great demo to win right a different time. And then there is in a negotiation, of course, is a probably a big, you know, skill set as well. And then there’s other probably just general other skills that we look at as well, right, maybe more, you know, how to prioritize your time, you know, how to, you know, things like this, right, which is just a constant like reminders along the way, you know, so, so generally, every year, we look at those few buckets, you know, and then across our different regions, may be different regions have slightly different needs, right, based on, you know, kind of by the sellers we have in the regions, if they are particularly more new sellers, then, you know, kind of probably a lot more training around our processes, our tools and stuff like this, you know, versus maybe you go to another region where we have a lot more 10 sellers, that meets maybe a little bit different as well, right. So yeah, so, but definitely top focus for us an onboarding, right, generally, that’s a big one as well. And we are continuously learning and this is one like both john and Josie, I love to learn from others as well. How do we do onboarding in a virtual world? Right, like, you know, we are, you know, I mean, you know, we’re constantly hiring people. But it’s so it’s so different, right, trying to onboard someone in person, and they have the benefit of turning their head. And as someone, right, you’ll see, like, you know, Josie is a 10. seller, and I hate to see a running into this, what can I you know, what, can I lose a lot of that, you know, kind of like, being the proximity, you know, too close to someone who knows. And so that’s something very top of mind for my team. And you know, we’re continuously looking at ways around, you know, how can we do better onboarding? Yeah. So this one, I’d really love to hear from others. And Josie as well, I know, you know, you’re very experienced and have tons of ideas as well. Yeah.

The Collaborator
Well, next week, we’ll have a roundtable on this very topic. So make sure you’re aware of it as well.

Siew Hoon Goh
Yeah. Yeah. You know,

Josie Marshburn
it’s interesting, because I’ve been talking to a lot of college students right now, that are either entering college for the very first time, or they’re in college, and they’re having to take classes in a different way. And they’re all giving feedback on, you know, the experience itself, the learning experience. And it’s interesting, because I think higher education could learn so much from corporate America, corporate America could learn times from higher education, and what’s working and what’s not working. So it’s just a really interesting dynamic. Yeah.

The Collaborator
Oh, great, great. josey. Now, that was an interesting topic, and interesting set of questions that I would love to have Sue back on to talk about for another three hours. But I’m gonna jump, I’m gonna jump ahead. Because I think you’ve done some really interesting stuff with first identifying that sellers need more time, and trying to make sure that they are getting more time. Now we all know, sellers, on average, get 33 spend 33% of their time actually having sales conversations. What were you finding it at in your team and Microsoft in terms of that, to make you say, oh, holy crap, I need to fix this, and how did you

Unknown Speaker
start to fix it soon?

Siew Hoon Goh
Yeah, not talk to me. And I would say, john, we probably was a brow there, right, when we first started this, like, you know, two years ago. And then, you know, we kind of sat back and you know, as an lt leadership team, and they say, like, our mission is to really help our customers to be successful, right. But yet, if we were not spending the time, you know, with them to understand their priorities and how we can help them you know, to our technology, then you know, and find a way for our sellers and our sales team, they get the most energy but they are talking to their customers not you know, sitting in a meeting room or you know, a with like, you know, being you know, inspected or going through reviews, right? I cannot I cannot I have never seen a seller who if I asked them to say where they get energy, they will be like, Oh, yeah, you know, sitting in a review for our MVR QPR you know, in a review, you know, to be expected about my business like nobody, I’ve never met anyone, right. So no one does. Yeah, no one does. Right. And so, you know, this is this is, you know, the nature of why they become a seller is they want to be, you know, able to help their customers. And so about two years ago, I would say we started thinking about like, hey, how can we, you know, do a better job Be proactive about this. Right? So we start at what we call a customer first initiative, which is all about increasing customer face time for ourselves. And by the way managers as well, right. It’ll be my primary focus, we started with our individual contributor sellers. And that was, you know, something we, you know, SLT was very focused on to be very deliberate about it.

The Collaborator
That’s so cool. Now, how did you actually determine? Or did you determine how much time they were actually spending? Because I know one of the things that I when I talk to people about this to like, what, jeez, I don’t know how much time they’re actually spending, you know, talking to customers. And the last thing I want to do is pull them into another meeting to talk about, and why are they spending more time in front of us? Yeah. How do you figure it out? Or did you sue them?

Siew Hoon Goh
Yeah, no, one of the things is, Hey, I like it, I work in an amazing technology company, right, like, you know, like, a lot of a lot of what the question we were asking, you know, definitely, I’m sure we have some technology. Right. And, you know, Microsoft definitely has it. And so I don’t know, whether it’s, you know, you know, all of you heard about it, but we have this amazing add on in office 365, that it’s called the workplace analytics. So basically, it takes a lot of the, you know, office 365 collaboration data, right, and then basically pull that together and give great insights about, you know, how much time you know, we’re spending, right, both internally and externally, how your network looks like, you know, how are you collaborating? And all of that, right? And so is it gives, it provides data on a weekly basis on, you know, where and how you’re spending your time? So I know the first question many, you know, when I talk to people about workplace analytics, the first question people have is, Oh, my God, like, Can my manager see all of that, like, you know, like, you know, like, spending my time and my outlook and stuff, right? And I’d say it’s no right, or very resounding no, no, this data only shared with the individual level. All right, are we very strict privacy control. So for example, every week, on a Monday morning, when I open my Outlook, you know, I get a meal, which is about, you know, Scott, like, you know, analytics that tells me, hey, in the previous week, you know, kind of how I’ve spent my time, right. So it’s great for me to kind of recap to say, am I kind of, you know, if I, my focus is spent more time externally, am I seeing that or not? We do, we do aggregate this data at a very high level, for us to know. And so we are never able to see individual level, right, and we get data, at least, you know, a certain number and above, you know, for us to be able to see how we are trending directionally right, because, and I’ll talk a little bit later, john, about, you know, kind of, you know, how we get some information and insights for us to know where to focus on. Yeah, we want to know, hey, whatever we are doing is directionally, we’re trending, you know, at the right at the right direction. And are we making progress, right, so you know, what pace analytics actually allows us to be able to see that, it also we look at that data weekly, and then monthly as well, which then gives us an overall good average. And we train that just over time, just to see, you know, kind of how we are doing.

The Collaborator
Yeah, isn’t isn’t I mean, what is the data? Without getting into too much details to basically say, Oh, this is an internal meeting, this was an external meeting, is it basically at that kind of level? So you can say, Oh, nice. Yeah. So So how have How have you grabbed or captured all of that data in a way that you can easily aggregate it, measure it and twist and turn it to see what’s really going on?

Siew Hoon Goh
Yeah, so basically, a lot of it ties to kind of every person’s outlook, right, like in a window was the external meeting and stuff, right? So you can see amount of time you spend, right? And in emails, you know, we wouldn’t know how much time you spend on writing an email or responding to an email. So it does some assumptions. To say, for example, if you send an email average, maybe 510 minutes, right, and so it kind of built into the assumptions and and build it up along the way, right? And then times if you call true teams, for example, on the call that might not be on your calendar, or a customer call you, right, he would also be able to kind of differentiate, you know, like, with the data, so he’s not exact size, right? Because it’s never, like in a perfect in a way, but, you know, but directionally we always consistently use the same assumption over the trend, we’ll be able to tell you, right, are you moving it or kind of, and then we supplement it by a lot of qualitative insights as well, right? Because that tells you the progress and where you are, but it doesn’t tell me why like the sellers are not, you know, spending, you know, Tom externally, for example. And so this is where we do a lot of roundtables. You know, we leverage a lot of our listening mechanisms, right? We do surveys, we do a lot of roundtables. You know, get feedback, you know, from the leaders from my own team. And so we take all of this and kind of build a list right around, what are the major blockers, right, and some are quick wins, we can quickly kind of go, you know, and make a change, some are maybe more structural stuff, you know, we have to work overtime to change it. But it really comes down, I would say to a couple of things, right? One, he gives me better tools, right, to be able to kind of do my work better and know where to prioritize my time. Secondly, simplify the process. Right, like, you know, I mean, you know, in any big companies, I don’t think it’s a surprise, right, like, you know, it tends to be if you want to get anything, you know, you have to go through a little bit of an onerous process, right. So, finding the right people and all that stuff. Right. So, so that’s another big, you know, kind of bucket. And then the third one is reduce internal aerobie meetings for me, right, like, you know, I don’t have to be in you know, like it all kind of, you know, sitting daily, you know, to update, you know, my managers and my leaders about where my deals are, and my pipeline and everything, right, like, you know, if I update everything into my CRM system, you know, let’s use that as the source of truth. Right, rather than, you know, asking them Davey, right, so no,

The Collaborator
we need to ask you to enter it in the CRM, and then we need to ask you to review every deal in detail. And then yeah, no, I’m with you. I’m with you. Then

Siew Hoon Goh
we asked you, how come he hasn’t changed from like, the last 24 hours, like

The Collaborator
15 minutes ago? Why isn’t this? I know

Siew Hoon Goh
exactly

The Collaborator
what surprised you soon. I mean, did you were there any surprises that you saw in terms of time syncs with the with the sales teams?

Siew Hoon Goh
Nothing that kind of like to surprising john, right. Like, you know, and it’s, you know, it’s public comments around like, and, like, it’s so amazing to see the consistent teams in every region I go to right, like, yeah, it’s very similar, right, like, you know, and, and when I first started two years ago, like the tools was probably the loudest, right? Because it was the biggest pain First of all, right?

The Collaborator
Oh, no, no good tools, or too many tools.

Siew Hoon Goh
was funny when, right? We thought when they’re prospecting, let’s say, No, and starting to prepare for a customer engagement, they probably have to go to 20 tools, right? to kind of get, you know, all the data, for example, right, like, and so over time, we’ve kind of really brought together into a single please, right? Hey, you know, if you want to know about everything about your customer, you know, you can go into this, you know, customer 360, you know, like,

The Collaborator
a huge savings. Yeah, that

Siew Hoon Goh
alone itself is just like a huge saving, right, like, you know, and so we kind of, you know, chip off the, you know, the rocks bit by bit, right, the big the quick wins, and then there are some stablized say, you know, we are still working on right, that’s why we are we are you know, this is not like a, hey, we already dead? And that’s it right? Like we like never right?

The Collaborator
No, it’s a marathon, it’s a marathon.

Siew Hoon Goh
Yeah. And by the way, it was like, gotta be careful that you’re not chipping off one thing. And, you know, we added on to other things somewhere else as well. Right. Like, it’s not a whack a mole as well. Right. So you have to keep a close eye, you know, on that as well, just to make sure. So like, you know, the constant, you know, listening to the sellers, you know, to making sure that you know, nothing else is popping up everywhere as well. It’s super important. Yeah. Oh, it’s

Josie Marshburn
a wacko.

The Collaborator
Oh, yeah. Me too. Me too. Well, how do you how do you make sure I mean, you said you’re listening to the sellers constantly looking at the data constantly. Change Management is such an important part of what we all Yeah. And how, how have you formalized? Or to what degree Have you formalized your approach there soon? That changes?

Siew Hoon Goh
Yeah, we do. You know, like, so we have kind of like, basically, we do very regular, like surveys in a way twice a year, we go and ask ourselves specifically those questions as well, right? Like, Hey, how are you feeling about you assessing yourself? Like, you know, do you feel good about where you are in terms of being able to spend enough time with the customers? And then we ask them for feedback around the tools, the processes, and you know, and kind of and so it gives us a good house around it all? Like, you know, the data shows us one thing, but I also want the sellers to be able to kind of say, do they feel that the progress they have made, you know, is good and so important? Yeah, so important. The salvage knowledge meant right, like, you know, so it has to be very intentional in a way right. And a lot of my team has been also, I would say like really helping the sellers to be very intentional in their Callender management is a big one as well. Right? And this is one I feel it myself. You know, if your calendar is open, we fill it with a lot of stuff, right? We don’t learn to prioritize what are the most important stuff. So if as a seller you don’t proactively block the time as scheduled, You know, like engagement with your customers, you will get a lot of people telling you what to do with your time. And this is not the most important thing, right? Like, you know that you want to spend your time. So if you don’t manage it yourself, you will be letting other people manage your calendar

The Collaborator
such a, you’re such a huge tip there soon and so critical. I know, selfishly, for me, I take three hours every morning. And I seriously on my calendar, I block off three hours. And whatever my top priority is, I make sure that every morning, I knock that out, so I’m intentionally defining what my priority is. And I’m working on it. And then the rest of the day might go to hell. I mean, to be blunt, it might, because other things pop up. And that’s okay. But I love that how have how have they reacted to it the different sellers? And how, what sort of framework or Rubric or whatever? Have you given them to figure out how to make that priority and balance the calendar in a smart way?

Siew Hoon Goh
Yeah, I think a lot of it is like, you know, kind of, of course, a balance of top style. Right, like, you know, it’s the messaging the tone from the top, you know, from, you know, from our leader from the sales leader, you know, locally as well, right? It’s Top of Mind, right, like, you know, we talk about it all the time, you know, so in our all hands and all of that, you know, my boss, you know, we talk about it all the time around, you know why this is important, right, like, super important. And then also, I think, at the, you know, local level, right? I think that’s where my sales excellent team plays a huge role as well. Right? Like, be there with them, coaching them right around it, right? It’s not about it’s not, you know, kind of like a hot sell or like, you know, kind of like, you know, like penalizing them for it and start, right, which is, hey, genuinely, I really want to help you be successful. And I really want you to be able to spend more time, right? And so you know, that soft coaching around it, right? Like, hey, let’s be deliberate about it. Right. And by the way, in current environment, we’ve also asked them to be very deliberate in their kolender about taking time for themselves, even blocking time for lunch for themselves, blocking time in all for their family. Right, like, even whatever makes them sane, right, blocking time to go for a walk or something. Like be very deliberate about it. Right. So you know, so I think this has, you know, kind of been such a big in a culture ship in a way, right, like, you know, be very intentional. How do you balance in a work in a live balance as well from your collector? Right, you know, so I think just overall, you know, I would say like, all of that coming together, just you know, probably helps to bring it all together, in a way. Yeah, I’m

The Collaborator
going to agree words of wisdom in there, from the top down, driving of this change and supporting of this chain from the top down, explaining the why of matters building in time for yourself, as well as the business and whatever else matters. So many great tips there soon. Now, we’re close to 30 minutes, and I want to be sensitive to your time and everybody else’s. Let me ask you this, though. What, what kind of results? Have you seen whether it’s people feeling better, performing better, staying longer, better sales? What are you see? outcomes?

Siew Hoon Goh
No, totally, I wouldn’t go into like, exactly when I say like, the customer satisfaction level has gone up, right? Like, because now that sellers are spending more time, you’re not, you know, you’re not calling me just because I haven’t read Neil coming up or you’re not calling me right. Like, just because we have a deal coming up what’s done, right? Like, it’s genuine being in a one to be part of their business to make them successful. Right. Like, you know, that is so important, right, from a customer experience perspective and important. Totally, and then employee satisfaction, right? Like we say, like, if you’re a seller, you get most joy and passion and energy from talking to the customers, right? Not you know, not the reveal. And so, you know, that itself, you know, makes them happy as well. Right? Like, yeah, and then you know, once I think you have that, you know, like for me, you know, you said the right culture, you hire the right people, the results will come naturally. Right.

The Collaborator
I agree with you soon. Yeah, I really do. Um, and I think we need to always take keep into account that our people, sellers, whatever roles there are people, so making sure that we take into account their journey, their satisfaction really critical. I love that. Josie what what did I ask? What did I ask my friend?

Josie Marshburn
I don’t know. Cuz this was a great conversation I loved Sue, I loved how you went through not only reducing the number of tools, but helping people have a more of a balanced life. Like I think we forget that all the time. Right? Look at how can we be more productive? And how can we sell more? And how can we do more, and we forget about the individual, the person. So I applaud you for bringing that in as well, though, and by the way,

Siew Hoon Goh
like, it’s one of the things we’ve been pushing a lot more recently, it’s just, you know, with this environment, like having, you know, over pivoting on empathy, and focusing on well being, like, is huge, like, huge, huge, like, you know, so, like, Don’t ever underestimate that, right, like, you know, that’s something you know, like, you know, as a leadership team, in a while we kind of, you know, of course, is about business results, we, we have been trying very hard to balance it around, well being as well, right. Like, you know, and it is so critical at this moment in time, like, yeah,

The Collaborator
that’s amazing, that really assume, you know, what, what did I ask you about that we that we should have covered in this in this far too fast moving clock? That gave us 30 minutes, and it went by super fast? What What else should I have asked you about that we didn’t cover?

Siew Hoon Goh
No, I think that’s great question, john. I’ll say ultimately, at the end of the day, like, you know, if you ask me what like maybe the most thing, you know, what’s the thing I’m most proud about? You know, that we have done? For me? I think it’s the culture. Right? Like, you know, it’s really the culture, right? Like, I think, broadly, as I look at, you know, our business, our overall SMC team, right, the culture we build, and the resilience and tenacity of our sellers, I am just amazed. I mean, I must tell you how amazing I am just in the last couple of months, just seeing how everybody, you know, to this environment has to put in their best helping their customers. And by the way, in this current environment is really challenging, right? Because they are on the call really hard on cars every day with customers who really might be going through very tough times. Right? And so, you know, like, and that they themselves have to provide the right energy for them. And right. And so, you know, I’m just amazed by the tenancy and resilience about him. And I will say internally within my team as well, right, the culture we appeared about, how do we, you know, listen to feedback with an open mind, right, like, you know, it’s and, and that’s why I think the beauty comes in, right? When you have that, then you take that, and then you you know, you can go act on it and deliver something that is helpful to the day that is helpful to the sellers, right, rather than we kind of spinning in our own mind, like, Oh, you know, like, this will be a very cool thing to do, right? And then you launch it to the sellers, the sellers are like, no. Yeah, so for me, the culture part, you know, underlies so much of what we do every day,

The Collaborator
when you are a analytics data driven phenomenon. I know that. So hearing you bounce that with such an empathetic and understanding and caring view of the people is amazing soon. So I applaud you. And I thank you for sharing those those tips with us all because they’re so important. And I will remind people, even when we’re all looking for those silver bullets, they get more sales and more wins and all that the people are what’s going to carry us across the finish line, and not just this quarter, or this week, but in the long term. So what you really just proposed what you really just talked about there soon was so important. And so thank you, and thank you everybody for stopping in and listening and Josie, my friend, it’s always good to see you. And I’m glad you were able to jump on to. And we are going to do this again. Because I’m going to convince to whom to come in on a roundtable with other enablement leaders to talk about something and maybe it’s the building great organizations from the inside out or something. But we’re gonna do this again, because I didn’t get enough time talking to you and self has

Siew Hoon Goh
gone on forever.

The Collaborator
I know I know. We really good. All right, my friends. I’m gonna let you get back to you. Thank you all

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