The power of sales coaching when it overlaps with life coaching

Pooja Kumar, Gayle Charach, Vijay Singh, and Peter Hancock joined The Collaborator to discuss the power of sales coaching for the whole human being.

The stories were inspirational, funny, and enlightening, ranging from:

1️⃣The short term impacts that Pooja’s coaching had on Vijay’s perspective, to how it changed how he worked, led, and coached his own team.

2️⃣The long term impact that Peter has experienced, leading to large ripples throughout those that he has coached, his own personal pathway to living a more balanced life, and the years of successes that have resulted.

Coaching is a critical component to all of our lives, both personally and professionally.

Give a listen and remain curious.

Audio Transcript

The Collaborator
Come for amazing people beyond beyond compare and I’ll let them introduce themselves because I will not do them justice but I’m going to start with Pooja because Pooja, you are a dear friend and a trusted advisor running the show for coffee collaboration enablement in India and ASEAN and I’m gonna start with you.

Pooja Kumar
Oh well I’m honored to be started with them. Thank

Unknown Speaker
you.

Pooja Kumar
So I am Pooja and I in apart from running copy collaboration and enablement for India and, and ASEAN. I’m also in my day job leading the sales enablement and organizational culture strategy for Oracle Business Development Group for APEC. I’m also a coach and I use different coaching programs as part of my enablement strategy. That’s me.

The Collaborator
Well, you know what, Oracle’s impressive I guess but coffee collaboration and enablement. That’s what we mean. That’s what I

Unknown Speaker
that’s what I lead with.

The Collaborator
Amen. Gail, my friend, how are you? Tell us about yourself.

Gayle Charach
I’m good. Thank you. I am the head of sales enablement at fireeye. Currently, and I’ve got a long as history for the last, I don’t know, 1617 years of working in enablement. It’s my passion. I love what I do. I love helping people. And coaching plays a huge role in what I do, not only in my day to day, but for long term projects as well. So I’m really excited for today. I need to meet Oh,

The Collaborator
all right. All right. DJ, come on DJ, your turn.

Unknown Speaker
Oh, no, DJ, your muted? muted.

Vijay Singh
Hi, can you hear me now?

Unknown Speaker
We can DJ No worries.

Vijay Singh
Welcome to the new new normal. So hi, I’m, I have the India Business for Business Development Group at Oracle. honored to be here. Especially with Pooja who’s helped me a lot during the span of the last three years of my career. I love leading people. That’s my passion. I’m an emotional guy. So I use a lot of that into leading people. And thank you for having me a

The Collaborator
brand. Here, take us home, my friend take us home.

Peter Hancock
I’ll take everyone ready to go get her Hancock I am at optiv Security Solutions integrator, run our pre sales enablement, go to market solutions and messaging teams and worked with Gail many, many years ago. We’ll hear about that story soon. But been in the security industry for quite a while based here on the east coast.

The Collaborator
Wonderful. Now you guys are an amazing group of people. And I enjoyed the heck out of our pre conversation about this topic. And I wish I had recorded that too, because that was gold. But we wanted to start this conversation to share with the community sort of from two perspectives, one from somebody who’s newer to get into coaching and how it’s impacted them in the short term. And we’re gonna start off with Pooja and vj on that. And then we’ll talk to Gail and Peter, a little bit about sort of the long term impact and how it’s played out. But I would encourage this entire group to jump in, throw out your questions and your insights. Let’s have some fun here together. And for everybody listening, pay attention, there’s going to be a story about maple syrup. Pay attention, that’s an important part of surfing coaching, it’s a real thing. You want to start us out and talk to us a little bit about how you came about working with DJ.

Pooja Kumar
Yeah, absolutely. So what Okay, so as the sales enablement leader, I need to look for gaps and challenges quite regularly. Right. So one of the gaps I noticed where as I was looking at building the strength, the leadership in our management team, is that we said, you know, what we do what most people do is they they hire a good salesperson, to become a manager. That’s how it goes often in the in the industry, which is a strategy. And then we put them into all this training to say, Okay, now you need to know this whole people side of things. So Vijay was one of these fantastic salespeople that two years ago came into our organization as a, as a manager as a new well actually team leader at that stage as a new team lead. And we put them on all this training and it was great training. It’s fantastic training. But what happens is when they come back and they come to their desk and they get You know that they do what they know how to do, which is how do I make numbers? And how do I how do I get to my number. And all that training kind of was really exciting for the one and a half weeks of the redoing it. But I can’t remember what the grow model is about. I don’t know how to apply this to my conversations. And sometimes it becomes easier not to. So what I did was I actually introduced a program to help managers develop their coaching muscle because I saw that was a gap. And that that particular program was called shadow coaching with the managers, were I and in this case, we we for eight weeks actually turned out to be six weeks because he’s just so clever. But for about six weeks, we I sat into his one on ones. And via zoom, so I wasn’t physically there. And with my with my video off and, and on mute. So I’m listening to his conversation for about 45 minutes. And the rep knew what was going on and had agreed to it. So in all cases, the reps know and agreed to it. And there is a level of confidentiality established. And so after that 45 minutes, we sit down for about 15 to 20 minutes. And I talked to them about, you know what went well, and what they could do better and how they could apply the next model and, and just building on to that quite regularly. And so that’s how I came across vj. And that was a couple of years ago. And I know he’s not going to say this, I’m just going to brag for him, I’m going to be his bragger. But over the two years, he has really turned around this, he looks after the India Business, which is an incredibly important business for our company. And he’s turned the team around the performance around the team is consistently excelling in our organization around Japan and Asia Pacific, actually, not just AIPAC constantly excelling. And he’s always wanting to learn more. So he himself has developed as an incredible leader. Actually, Vijay, I’m really proud of how you’ve developed and, and still developing and not only on his team, but he’s also we’ve seen some phenomenal results on the individuals that he has coached in his team on a few individuals that have really broken, you know, broken the ceiling and done some amazing work outside of the team as part of their own progression. So they’ve moved into some phenomenal roles. Okay, so that’s my that’s how I met Jay. And I think he’s awesome. And he’s just

Unknown Speaker
because

The Collaborator
and I think that’s and I think that’s amazing. What struck me though, Hoosier was, when you talked about a week and a half of manager training, I usually see it that the seller hits their quota, they instantly get a team assigned to them with no training. And it’s like good luck, just go into quota. And I’m impressed that Oracle at least does some level of buffering training. You know, Gail, you know, I’ll throw it to you and Peter as well. How do you guys typically in the course of your career, have you seen that formal training program before you transition over?

Gayle Charach
It’s rare, I think it’s rare. I think we did see it, Peter and I at Symantec in their top talent program where they did that’s exactly what they built was a program to champion top performers so that they could move into management roles in a comfortable scenario. So I have seen that it’s rare. It’s very rare. And when it happened, take advantage.

Peter Hancock
Yeah, I’d say man, we’re, we’re I have responsibility for enablement globally for optive. And we are building out a people leader program. first line. So what are the essentials, thinking about crucial conversations, emotional intelligence, how to do performance management, all the way through executive coaching. Our topic today and making sure that our ELT and what we call our optive leadership group, really has skills and the wherewithal to represent at the top at the highest levels to make crucial conversations, sorry, crucial decisions, to drive the business forward to grow the business beyond where we are today. So it’s a big investment for us this year. And we’re going to put think, almost 300 people leaders through a development course on three different tiers depending on where you are in your leadership career. Over the course of this year and going into next year.

Unknown Speaker
We’ll be seeing the impact of coaching. Looking back to coaching.

Unknown Speaker
Yeah, amazing impact.

Peter Hancock
pentester remember it very well,

The Collaborator
it’s a one of one of the key lessons here is, and I know we all say this all the time, but code, train, and educate your managers just like you train and educate everybody else. And it’s training and coaching combined. And it’s great to hear the investments being made there, Peter, DJ Yahushua, Justin just just gave you praise, that I’ve never heard given to anybody before. So I expect to see you on the currency. At some point in the future, maybe a nice, you know, $1 bill with your face on it, or something. But what was it from the coachee? From the coached person perspective? What was it like for you? And what was your initial reaction to Pooja being like, I’m gonna listen into your phone calls and give you feedback, and then sort of how how’s that impacted you?

Vijay Singh
So I think when you land up in a new role, you’re already excited, you think you know, and that’s the biggest block. So I came from a 14 year sales background, and I thought, listen, there’s a bunch of young talents, which I really need to push them to get the numbers done. And that was a stupid idea. Because I didn’t get to know them. Well, I didn’t get to understand why they are here. And, and this was in the beginning of, I think, the first month of my role. And thankfully, that is when Pooja stepped in and said, Listen, you are a guy with a high emotional intelligence. And I think that is one of the biggest strength you’ve had during your sales career. Why don’t you turn things around and you know, start talking to people heart to heart and understand who they are. I love the idea. And I’m actually have opened up later on my life to learn more and just not say no. And that has helped me a lot. Pooja told me to try something new, and I was all in for it. And suddenly, what I see is, let’s say, in the span of about four months, the team was open to me, they were starting to discuss things which they might not have even discussed with their parents, because, you know, the worlds are very different. And that brought me into a very responsible shoe. I started behaving like, you know, they need somebody here, they’ve left their home, they’ve traveled all the way to Malaysia, maybe I’m the only person they have right now. And once that emotional intelligence connected, I could see wonderful things happening for them. And eventually, I also grew in the organization, I got promoted recently with, you know, four of my other team members. So that was that was great. And I would like to thank you for that.

The Collaborator
Let me ask you this though. vj. I remember 400,000 years ago, when I had my first opportunity to lead a team, I thought I knew everything. And I thought it was I would have been uncomfortable. I felt like I needed to have this persona of knowing at all and being in charge. And it was such a mistake for me. And it sounds like you might have had a similar sort of approach coming in. What did Pooja say anything to you is in particular? Or was it just sort of the the the interactions, those coaching interactions that made you wake up to it on your own? Because I still behave that way? For the record? Because if I didn’t

Vijay Singh
know, I think I think there was one comment that Pooja made, which was very helpful for me. And she said, just open up, you know, it’s okay to have leaders with less knowledge about something and that is when the team comes into play, you learn back from the team, it’s not just one way street, you know, and I’ve got some really talented people in the team. I have hand picked them, I have, you know, interviewed them personally, and there was a certain reason why they are in the team. So if I have trusted my decision to take them in the team, I might as well trust them to give me back some information. So once you’re open to listen, you know, be mindful when you’re sitting down with them, just hear them out what they have to say, maybe try out some ideas what they are throwing at you. And that actually changed a lot of dynamics in between the team you know, we became more bond bonded and it was it was like a family that love that. I love that mpj Shivani Gupta and I apologize Shivam if I’m mispronouncing your first name, just was throwing out you know, developing real and transparent relationships with the team is not a skill, every leader has an in their opinion, that’s part of the reason why you’re successful is because you’ve taken the time to understand that. And clearly,

The Collaborator
clearly, you reached that point of understanding faster. By having a coach in your life helping get you there, you may or may not have reached that point as fast as you did otherwise. I know for me in all sincerity, it took me a while to realize how stupid I was that I didn’t have all the answers, and that I needed to behave differently. And it sounds like having a great coach in your life opened you up to that so much faster. And it’s great for you and the business and your team.

Vijay Singh
Yeah. And also, I mean, just to give you an example, I have, I inherited a set of people in the team. And one of them was really, I mean, all of them are talented, but this guy was hungry for success, and you don’t meet people like that every day. And once I stepped in, the first conversation we had was, he just came to me and he said, I just want to leave the job and I want to join somewhere better. I want to join the sales team. And during the coaching period with Pooja, I understood that I need to listen more, I need to talk less and listen more when I’m sitting with my team in the room, I need to be very mindful, emotionally present for the person. empathetic if let’s say things are not working out, he’s been there in the same role for let’s say, about three years, which is a lot for people in the younger generation. I want to be empathetic for that. And once we started talking about what this person wanted to do, and I started asking only questions from, you know, I’ve seen this, when people go back home and start thinking about what they want to do. They never stick to the plan the first time. They almost never so and that shows you that they are working on it that shows you that, you know they they have thought about it. And they have thought about themselves. So this guy broke all records. I mean, once he went back, he thought about it, I gave him a sheet of paper to fill in. I gave him about two weeks to, you know, fill that map up, what he wants to do what he was before, how will he use the previous experience, and you know how he will network with the right people. And once he came back with that map, he said, I don’t want to go to sales. And you know, that was a relief for me because I knew he could do things bigger than just being a sales rep. And today, he is a product leader and a technical consultant for a huge company in Malaysia. So I’m really proud shout out to avesh really proud of him. But that’s what coaching does to you. And I learned a lot from that process. And I learned because there was a quote coach behind me saying, just be open.

The Collaborator
I love that I love that vj. And, you know, that’s obviously one of the messages we want to get across in this conversation is how the coaching directly impacted you how it’s impacted your team and their future successes. So maybe I could we can switch gears to Gail. Now Gail. I don’t know if it’s too early for maple syrup story but

Gayle Charach
no, I’ll get the maple syrup. Sorry.

The Collaborator
You’re you’re not nearly old enough to be the after story. Yeah, I’m saying that vj Pooja are really sort of the near term benefits of the coaching that we’ve explored. You and Peter started working together a little longer back. What can you tell us about that experience from your perspective?

Gayle Charach
So it’s funny My parents always said that I other kids collected stamps, I collected people. And and I and anyone who knows me knows I’m a people champion. So years ago, I was in New Hampshire, we were running a set of deal reviews. And there was this sc in the room who was so super sharp. And I remember thinking he’s got more business savvy than anybody else in this room. I ran into him on the stairs later. And I pulled out a bottle. I always travel with maple syrup, so I can give it as little gifts to thank people for working with me. So I gave him a bottle of maple syrup. And I said I I must tell you, I don’t think I’ve ever met a sales engineer who is as as business minded as you. And I just I was blown away. And that was it. So I was super impressed with his business savvy. And so I told him now fast forward a few years, I’m at Symantec, I’m tapped we had this new HR program around top talent. And not only was I tapped as top talent, but I was tapped to be developed as a coach so that I could coach to director level and above in their top talent program. So one of the clients that was handed over to me was Peter, and Peter and I spent a year of coaching together by phone and then

The Collaborator
never face to face right I

Gayle Charach
never saw each other I never saw never saw. I didn’t even know what he looked like other than maybe his LinkedIn picture. That was it. So we had an incredible year together. It was it was so empowering for me, and certainly watching the progress for him. I watched him go from a very gray sky to a very blue sky. And it was just such an incredible year of growth for both of us. So fast forward, we realized that we’re going to have an opportunity to meet because we’re both going to be at the sales kickoff. So we agreed to meet at one of the keynotes, we went, we sat together through the whole thing. As we get up to start walking out. Peter turns to me and he says, and you know, we’re chit chatting, and it was so nice to finally meet them put the faces together. And he said, You don’t remember me? Do you? And I? What do you mean, I don’t remember you. I’ve been coaching you for a year. What it what it? What do you mean? Well, who was the store who was the SEC on the stairs years ago in New Hampshire, but Peter Hancock, I coached him for a whole year without ever realizing that this was the person I’d handed a bottle of maple syrup.

The Collaborator
I love that. I love that

Gayle Charach
story. And I bet if you ask Peter, you might even actually see the bottle.

Pooja Kumar
For how many years have you had that maple syrup? For? Sure.

Peter Hancock
Not coming out? I don’t think so. Is 2005 that would be about right.

The Collaborator
Before we ask Peter about his side of the experience, you said something I want to make sure everybody understood. You said he went from grey sky to blue sky. What did you mean by that?

Gayle Charach
So that was one of the approaches that I took with Peter was to I started my coaching with him for the year by asking him what color the sky was in his world. You might ask me why I chose that particular question to ask him. And that’s because Peter I felt was very, very left brain. I am 100% right brain it was I was Gosh, darn, I was going to elicit and liven up the left side or the right side of his brain. I just wanted to have him think differently. I knew that was going to be the the break for him. Right? So. So we started our year by me asking him Peter, what color is the sky in your world? And he’s sort of startled. He’s

Unknown Speaker
like, why?

Gayle Charach
Like, what are you talking about? I look out the window. In your imagination. Given your life today, what color would you say the sky was? And the answer came out is gray. And as the year progressed, my final question to him on our last day of coaching together was Peter, what color is the sky in your world today? And it was blue. And my whole heart was filled? My whole heart. I’m like I did it. I did it. We did it together. We did it. We got him there. And and what what’s been beautiful for me and Peter and I, we haven’t worked together since we don’t keep in regular touch. We keep in touch through LinkedIn, if you know it from time to time we reach up but I’ve watched his career. And I’ve watched his progression over the years and I I can’t help but being proud. And feeling like I had a little hand in this. I helped him grow enough that he could then pursue those other opportunities. And it just was a it was a beautiful journey together. It truly was. I love that.

The Collaborator
Now, Peter, I gotta ask you as a left brain person, were you saying blue just to get Dale to stop asking. But

Peter Hancock
I think today I would have done that. But back in 2005 I was so hard wired, that I didn’t even know how to do that. If I think about today, I’m always thinking five steps ahead either for my my team or my family or myself. Back then I was hardwired. I was. I mean I was young. I was doing well in my career. But I was a former consultant. I was a sales engineer. I was thinking this the entire way through and I got promoted to be a director for Eastern us. I probably had 100 reports of sales engineers with about 10 managers reporting to me big first jump going from moving down to the Mid Atlantic so middle part us like DC and Philadelphia area with eight people to the New York and Southeast and the entire east and that happened within a year or two. So I went from being a consultant to being a sales engineer to being a first line manager pretty quickly. And then that moved, got married had two awesome kids in my life fast. Instant family has a lot changed for me. And all of a sudden, my brain just mush is what it was.

The Collaborator
So how did how did the coaching the I’ll call it a friendship even over a year, impact how you viewed the world? And how do you think it’s impacted you since then?

Peter Hancock
Gail, when she asked me that question, I really was speechless to some degree because I didn’t know how to answer the question. And that’s not normal. But if you think of a wrench or a screwdriver, or whatever it was, she took it, and she turned it and she opened up something that I did not know I had in me, it was a it was very much a blind spot. So for a lot of young people that are out there, and whoever’s listening to this, there’s that moment of just go, go, go, go, go, I’ve always got to prove to myself, I’ve always to prove that I’m better than I am. today. I am a athlete, I am a competitor, I will try to ride my bike up the side of Mount Washington faster than anybody, which sounds really insane. But that’s me, right? So Go, go, go go. And Gail and her boss at the time and other executive coach, les kind of pulled me aside and said, you know, you’ve already accomplished everything that you think you’re still working to accomplish. And that was the next piece of it, which was pointing out that blind spot to say, you’re running after something you’ve already achieved. So how do we open up that box for you to say let’s, what’s more what’s available to you, that you don’t even know as possible. And through those conversations, I then started and this is a Brett shirk and john Sorenson thing to it was connecting to the human, and then starting to realize it’s not just about you, and what you need to do as individuals. Now, you know, as a, I consider myself a servant leader, I talk to my I talk to my team, I work for them. Consider self as a parent first. And usually, you know, parents eat last. Now I look at what is the care and well being of my team, and how do I make them successful. And if they are successful, and they are sticking around, and they’re bringing more of their people along for the ride, then we’re going to do better. But it was really that human connection. And when I went had the opportunity to go from running east to all of North and South America and started getting exposed to the Brazilian and Colombian and Mexican and even the Canadian cultures and having to do work in French and Portuguese, Spanish, and I was the executive sponsor for the Olympic Games. So that kind of brought in a whole new flair and mix that just got me on a path and a journey that I couldn’t explain to you today and opened up doors that I didn’t know was possible as a person who had started up with an eight person team, when I got into leadership for the second time and semantic and when I left, I had 350 people across two continents. And I ended up running global enablement for about a year and a half there too. So it just kind of fit into that perfect story of learning cultures and people. But without that conversation, it would not get unlocked. And I think my kids and and the people in my life, see me from house to house to house and this is probably house number four, that maple syrup box or bottle continues to stay present. For everyone who doesn’t believe me when we were doing this prep session two weeks ago, it was higher up on the shelves, but it was up there. Go find it. And it was pretty neat to just connect those dots with Gail.

The Collaborator
Let me ask Let me ask you, Peter and you vj you know as the people that receive the coaching, did you dal and Pooja were trying to teach you how to hit your numbers better how to lead your teams better? Or was the approach more about you as people where you were trying to achieve and uncover? And it’s okay the way what the answer is? I know I didn’t ask you that before but I’m curious how much of it was focusing on you as a human being with your individual needs and goals versus the business needs and goals? I’m curious to hear that thought.

Vijay Singh
Would you like to go first?

Peter Hancock
I’ve been taking a lot of Mike, I think we’re gonna have different answers. But go ahead.

Vijay Singh
Okay, thank you. No, never just to answer to your question, which has never tried to talk to me about numbers at all. It’s never been about numbers. So that was the most beautiful thing. It was always about, you know, if there’s somebody sitting opposite to you, who cares about you, you know, you feel that the person cares about you. That’s everything. And then you open up your ears you open up your brain to hear the person out. So it was always about improvement. How is that ripple effect going to take place? Once you improve your team improves, the company improve so that was the flow

The Collaborator
Lavelle, what about you, Peter, I can see Gail throwing stuff at you say?

Unknown Speaker
Well,

Peter Hancock
there’s another part of the story that involves a seesaw. And dry was very lopsided. I think I was on the ground. And then the other piece was all the way up here. And then at the very A year later, she asked me to draw it again. And it was a balanced line. Because I found a way to balance work life and everything else. Now, I’m not always good at it. Leaders generally are Yes, they do struggle at times, and you do your best, but I did find balance at least, or know how to get balance in my life when I knew I needed it.

The Collaborator
That’s wonderful to hear. Well, look, I could talk to you guys for the next five hours, because I’m really enjoying this conversation. But I like to be sensitive to we’ve gone 30 minutes, but I’m gonna ask each of you. And I’m going to go and I’m going to start with you again Pooja, and we’ll work back through for one piece of advice either as a coach or someone who’s received coaching, something that you think either coach should have keep in mind when they’re when they’re trying to coach or somebody has received coaching herself. What’s something that you really appreciate? That really opened it up for you?

Unknown Speaker
Um,

Pooja Kumar
okay, so if you are already a coach, and you’re working in a sales organization, my recommendation and the thing that really helps me Even now, I started off learning how to coach and training to be a coach, because I received excellent coaching from my sales leader, who is actually 20 odd years later, still my coach, so she’s still coaching me to be better to develop better to she, you know, at times of funk, and I have no idea what I’m doing right now and overwhelm. I often ring energies based in Germany now. So not even in my time zone. I ring anna and i say, hey, how do I manage this. And she walks me through again, you know, it’s very easy to get lost in the numbers, especially in a sales organization, in the pressure and the numbers and she met reminds me where my skills are, and helps me figure things out for myself. So I think the biggest advice is, if you are a coach, especially in a sales organization, but I guess it would be anywhere, remember to keep up in your own game. And remember that you sometimes may need a coach as well. I’ve got a call with that on Sunday, actually,

The Collaborator
I love that and I love she reminds you of who you are, what you’re good at, and brings you back to that real important, you know, understanding of what matters to you. So that’s really helpful. What about you, Gail?

Gayle Charach
So for me, at the same time, as I was coaching Peter, of course, I was in a coaching cadre and I was being coached I was being coached internally by by somebody who had also coached Peter. But shortly before all of this, I had a training budget that I was allowed to use. And we were asked what do you you know, what kind of training Do you want Excel whatever, like, you know, what, I’d rather spend my training dollars on coaching, can I get some coaching and at the time, I was really struggling a lot with you know, the the whole notion of, am I credible to stand in front of a sales audience when I don’t have the bag in my hand and, and she really helped unlock that, for me unlock for me where my credibility was and the fact that I had it. To this day, I have a little sticky note that says I am credible, and I do make a difference. And that came that evolution was out of the coaching that was provided for me. So my advice to anyone, take some time to do this yourself. Right? If you’ve got some training dollars, consider instead of going to another class about another, you know, SPIN Selling or another kind of selling think broaden your scope a little bit, invest in yourself a little bit. It helps to find not only the balance, but it helps you unlock where your credibility really is. So having been on both the receiving and the giving end, I’m 100% in favor of people looking for coaching opportunities.

The Collaborator
I may have to ship you a barrel of maple syrup. That was so good. Yeah,

Unknown Speaker
there you go.

Vijay Singh
DJ,

The Collaborator
you’re fairly new to it. You know the last couple of years you’ve been exposed to it what what advice and wisdom would you share with everybody from either side?

Vijay Singh
I think the two most important takeaways for me was being very mindful. You know, it empowers you to listen to the messages which You know, the coach who’s quite experienced and one’s good for you, is providing to you. And secondly, just be open to listen, you might just end up with one line, which might help you for all your life.

The Collaborator
Oh my god, that was impactful. I don’t know how you’re gonna follow that, Peter. I mean, seriously, it was really good vj cuz I love that because it may not be all gold, the entire coaching session, but it might just be one or two things that you needed to hear that needed to stick with you. And that was really powerful and very succinct. So I’m not that sincerely. And Peter, I Geez, I feel like you’re in trouble now.

Peter Hancock
You, I think you need to find your identity and your brand. And if you’re Canada, apparently that’s the bottle of maple leaf. Just leverage whatever, you know, wherever you got.

Unknown Speaker
Amen.

Peter Hancock
That’s the first thing. I think. The other piece is, I mean, six months ago, I was looking to hire a head of enablement for optive. And I called Gail and said, Gail, who do you know, who do you want to bring my way, and she gave me a whole bunch of names. And we had great conversations, and she actually set up another conversation for me on Friday. So one, as a coach, be authentic, be sincere, be vulnerable yourself, because you’re asking the person you’re coaching to be vulnerable. And if they’re going to really open up and provide to you the darkest of the dark, so you’re seeing those dark skies and you can help them get blue, then you as a coach, you’re gonna get that, that mirror effect that kind of the vulnerability back with you. But then it’s the journey together, and what journey Are you are you taking together? I didn’t necessarily know what I wanted from coaching way back then 15 years ago, I wouldn’t turn it down in a moment now. Because I know the power of it. But back then, I knew I was in the top talent program. And I was in that top 1%. And of course, my, my fire to be competitive, said, Okay, this is cool. What do I do with it? It’s kind of like, as, as an athlete, as a coach, there’s ways to train and there’s ways to compete that are hard. And you’re doing a lot more cadence that a lot slower rate than you need to, or you can do a high cadence, get faster results and and train your body better. And if you and you kind of go with the flow, and you open yourself up and you’d be vulnerable, and have those authentic conversations, you get a lot more out of the experience. And you know, when Gail called me up and said, Do you wanna be part of this session? I don’t, I don’t even think I asked her. Who you were john, I just said yes.

Gayle Charach
And I will say I was very cautious, as you know, john, because the one thing I will say is that the client coach relationship is confidential. It’s very personal. It’s very intimate, as Peter just suggested. So even to draw out the two stories of the gray sky and the seesaw. I wanted permission, it’s not something I would willingly share. And so that’s something else to bear in mind is that it’s a very, it’s a sacred, it really is a sacred bond. And trust, you have to give it the trust that it deserves. So

The Collaborator
well said, You know what, I’m, I don’t say this lightly. And I mean, it sincerely, you all inspired me. And I hope that you inspired some other people either that listen to this live, or who will listen to it afterwards. Coaching is extremely powerful. And it’s not just about hitting your sales numbers. It’s about individual human being, and helping people get there. So just gonna fall into place. I will share this last point because it made me laugh. J. Tyler, put in the chat, Gail, great to see Peter. And then a later comment, and you. Thank you.

Peter Hancock
Again, it’s been a while.

Gayle Charach
Coach of leaders, he is a supreme coach and leaders and Peter and I both today, so we love them.

The Collaborator
Wonderful. I just thought it was great. I said great to see Peter. And then and you and you. Good Good. Sanjay. Good. Say, Hey,

Pooja Kumar
john, before you close, can I just ask Peter, one thing? Can you come back and 10 years and let us know what happens to that maple syrup, please?

Unknown Speaker
like wine

The Collaborator
is not going to be good. That’s all I know. You guys all have a wonderful rest of your days, wherever you are in the world. Everybody else. Thank you for listening and I hope you do. Get it from this. I know I feel like I did. I did personally, and I hope everybody else did here as well. So thank you all. Bye bye

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