Author and Enablement Professional, T. Melissa Madian, joined Canadian Regional Host, Adriana Romero to share Enablement lessons and insights from her book:  “Enabler? I Hardly Know Her!: How to Make the Sales Experience Not Suck“.

Tons of great advice, including:

1️⃣ How, and when, to say no.

2️⃣Learning how to prioritize Enablement efforts and how to split efforts between proactive and reactive work.

Give a listen and remain curious.

Audio Transcript

Adriana Romero
Thank you for joining us and coffee collaboration enablement Toronto edition. And today I’m super excited to have the one and only chief fabulous officer, Melissa, Maddie, and it is. So I’m so excited to have you here. Like, you know what this is, this is our main reason for today. But I’m so excited to have you. Welcome.

T. Melissa Madian
Thank you. Great to be here. I’m always happy to chat with you. Adriana. And be on the show is great. Thank you.

Adriana Romero
No, thank you. And it’s funny because we were just chatting before we got on this, if any of you follow some of the stuff that I post on LinkedIn as well. We have been trying to buy a new car for my stepdaughter. And we’re just chatting about the experience as sales enablers when we have to deal with salespeople, especially car salespeople. But we will get into that topic a little bit later, Melissa, for those of you who are crazy enough not to know you, because if you are in enablement and you don’t know Melissa, please get to know her. Good. Tell us a little bit about yourself.

T. Melissa Madian
So I am actually a mechanical engineer by background. But I realized pretty quickly, I could not make the kind of money I wanted to make as a mechanical engineer. So I went in the sale. I have been in sales, I have been in marketing, I’ve been in post sales consulting work. And about in 2008 or So I sort of fell into sales enablement before it was a thing. And since then I have built and run field enablement, revenue enablement, sales enablement, functions that small startups that pre IPO companies at large corporations. Then about five years ago, I went out on my own and now I work with lots of organizations on building their revenue enablement structures, an answer only to myself as my own boss,

Adriana Romero
I love to you and to pickles, we have to pick out pickles, pickles is one part of your life. Because it’s Melissa’s cat. And sometimes I think that he is very famous. I always see him on Instagram and sometimes it pops into LinkedIn. Melissa, I wanted to start today talking about your book if you guys were listened to us, you can see my copy has been used, which is good. Melissa wrote this fabulous book called enabler I hardly know her. It’s a very easy read. It has a ton. As you can see, I have my post, it’s here a ton of information, especially if you are starting in enablement, like many people are starting right now. But unless I wanted to, to talk with you about you know, we just went through 2020 it was a crazy year, you know, we’ve done a lot and now you wrote a book, tell us more about becoming an author in the enablement space.

T. Melissa Madian
Yeah, I, I’ve always been wanting to write a book about enablement. And I’ve had several friends say, you know, you really should write a book about an ailment and just work and life got in the way and so during, during the pandemic, you know, there’s only so much cleaning of the basement and cleaning out your closets that you can do. So I was like, You know what, now now is the best time to actually park my flat down and write all of the thoughts that are rattling around in the empty space in my brain. So I said, You know what, I’m just going to focus I’m going to get it done. And, and that’s, that’s the book that you you have in your hands today. And my main focus my main driver was I don’t want to make this a dry stuffy book on I’m not a huge fan of reading business books if they’re boring. So my my cut at it was I want someone to be able to pick up the book, read it, you know, in one sitting even enjoy it, grab a glass of wine or two, and just chill out and enjoy just a really good read that provides some some good nuggets along the way. So that was that was my my intense with the book.

Adriana Romero
And I think that you, you know, for me if you actually did it, and what I loved about the book is that I got to know you as a person, I got to know you as an enabler. You know, I really I love because your story made me smile and laugh in so many ways. Because, you know, we come from the same background, pretty much, you know, in sales, we started around the same time we’ve been doing that. And I’m like, Yeah, but the most important thing that I got with this book is I realized a lot of thoughts that I was having, and you managed to put them into some sort of context and some organized, you know, organized matter. What type of feedback have you gotten of your book? And what are people what are people telling you of like, This book has helped me blank.

T. Melissa Madian
Yeah, so it’s what’s great is, you know, when you’re an author and you put out a book, you’re like, is that am I gonna read this? So one, people are reading it. So thank you for everyone who’s who’s purchased a copy and has read it and enjoyed it. What’s great is the feedback has been very much what my intent was for the book, which is, this is an easy read. This is this is a fun read. I myself don’t take myself too seriously. So I wanted that to come across. In the book where the feedback has been, I enjoyed it. But I also got these really good nuggets out of it. And especially for a lot of folks who don’t even know what enablement is about, it’s a good Starter Guide for them to just kind of wrap their brains around. What is this enablement thing that everybody’s talking about? And how can I even go about thinking about enablement? If I’ve never done it before, or even if I’m doing it, am I even doing it the right way. And the feedback that I’ve gotten is, you validated what what has been rattling around in my brain, and made me feel like I’m not alone in this in this enablement

Adriana Romero
world, which is so important, because you know, we have shared on this space many times how lonely the enablement function is, we don’t have other people in our everyday is to talk about what we’re doing. Hence, when we meet in our wives meetings are when we meet in the sales enablement, society meetings or any other organization that you’re part of. It’s like, wow, I get to talk with my people, and we get to understand each other. And this morning, I was actually having a conversation with a fellow enabler on how difficult it is for people who are starting, because there’s no guide. Like, you know, it’s like sales you there’s no place to study. Nowadays, there’s many resources, you know, you have academies and groups and coaches out there to help you kind of get started. But there’s nothing like that for enablement. Have you given any thought Melissa, and maybe like going that route, offering something to help the young enablers out there in the world?

T. Melissa Madian
So yeah, one I mean, I run my own consulting business. So one of one of the things that I do offer as a service is advisory services just I’m an enabler, and I don’t know I’m new. I was promoted from SDR to enable manner promoter for me to enable man and I have no clue what to do. Please help. And it’s one of the things that I do because, you know, I’m a crotchety old woman who’s done this for a gajillion years and jaded opinion or not, I have an opinion. So. So one of the services I provide is to actually coach young enablers that are that are going through this for the first time on, here’s what to think about. You’re not alone, what you’re experiencing isn’t dramatically different than a lot of other organizations that are going through the exact same thing. And here’s some, here’s some guidelines on how to go about doing the job so that you will have like a rock star. And I’m like the woman behind the curtain Pay no attention to the one behind the curtain.

Adriana Romero
Yeah, the awesome enablement. But normally, it’s not old and rickety. You’re like good wine, you just get better. I’m more experienced.

T. Melissa Madian
Yes, I’m well aged. Caroline,

Adriana Romero
I love that. I tell people I’m as well age as an 18 year old whiskey. So that’s, you know, that’s it. It’s not, you know, writing a book is nothing, nothing easy. You know, I it’s been a quest for me for a while, especially, I’ve been trying to venture into writing fiction, which is even more difficult, because there’s a whole world that you create in fiction that doesn’t exist, and you get immersed there. But also, there’s, for me, that creative process that comes with when you’re writing, there has to be like a certain setting, like your mind has to be in a specific place, the setting where you are, and it’s like, you have to have a flow, like a lot of people talk about right at least 30 minutes a day, or at least 10 minutes, right? Something, sometimes I feel it’s difficult because if I don’t have like two hours to sit down and focus on it, I don’t think I get it done. So you’ve been so busy and having all these things. Tell us about that process for you. That was like, you know, saying, Let me sit down and write sounds very simple. But then did you know tell me a little bit more about what Melissa went through when she was writing this book?

T. Melissa Madian
Yeah. So before the pandemic, I had started to write notes down for for this book. And I had kind of a running document that was sitting on my laptop that if I thought of something, I would just, I was sort of stopped what I was doing, go write it and get it done. When the pandemic hit, there was a lot of downtime. So, you know, I guess, silver lining for the pandemic, yeah, I was able to actually get some time in my day to sit down and write. But what’s interesting, and my husband’s a screenwriter and an author as well. So so he and I have talked about this a lot. Just because you sit down and say you’re going to write doesn’t necessarily mean the words are actually going to come out of your brain and onto the paper. So if I found some inspiration I was doing, if I’m doing something and I found inspiration, I actually would stop and let the words flow on to the paper. And then I would come back to it at a later date. If I sort of said, Okay, I’m going to my sit downtime, and we’re going to sit down and I’m actually going to look at everything I’ve written so far and make changes and adjustments and augment that But if there was a point where I was like, Oh, I want to write about this, oh, I want to write about SDRs, then I would just, I would let it all flow, and then come back to it later. And there was a lot of come back edit, come back at it, come back on that that’s that I went through.

Adriana Romero
I love the idea. I love the idea of I call it the journey document that you’re describing, because I’m pretty sure it was like scribbles. And but Oh, yeah, little dog

Unknown Speaker
crazy.

Adriana Romero
But I think that even translating that to what we do every day, as enablers, there’s so many things that come, that might not be a priority. There’s so many gaps that you identify, that might not be something that you can attack immediately. But I think that the process that you’re describing, for you to get that book out, it’s kind of like something that we as enablers have to do a lot, right? And I tell people, whenever you’re hiring an enablement person, make sure you see some sort of good organizational skills. And then, you know, either they’re very sophisticated, and they use a board like Asana or any of those project management tools, or they have the discipline to, you know, have posted notes or a document. Is that something that you also do when you’re working with your clients?

T. Melissa Madian
Oh, yeah, for sure. I’m, I’m a OneNote. Fan. So I, when I was running sales enablement, teams, field enablement teams, I would have a running one node document on here, all the things that either I have identified as a priority, or someone has come to me and said, Hey, we need this, we need this, we need this. And then in that sort of scribbled one node document, start to prioritize per quarter on what needs to be done. So now with clients, I encourage them to do the same thing like have some whatever works for you, whether it’s a mind map or a OneNote, or a Google Doc, or whatever it is, keep a running track, and then every quarter prioritize, you only have to be your only your human beings. So you’re only really going to be able to prioritize, you know, two to three things per quarter. So just choose the things that have the highest priority for that quarter, and then iterates, as you go through the year,

Adriana Romero
this is great. I’m going to drill down and drill in a little bit in this topic, because I have been seeing a lot of conversation and topics about his enablement, reactive or proactive. And where where does that kind of line shift because I truly believe there’s like a little swing that happens, sometimes you have to be reactive. But you should always have a percentage of what you’re doing be very proactive. And sometimes when you know, it’s not crazy, and there’s no changes, and you know, everything is kind of settled, you can be more proactive. What is your take, and how enablement should function?

T. Melissa Madian
Yeah, I think enablement should, in an ideal world be, you know, 80%, proactive and 20% reactive, because there’s always things that pop up. But the challenge is, most enablement functions are a person of one. And once that person of one is put into place, all of the other departments are like, Oh, we have some person, these 976 things that we need. So so that one person is suddenly overwhelmed with a bunch of requests, reactive requests. And what I tell a lot of young enablers now is you need to be really hard with your nose, you need to be able to say no, because you can’t, you can’t handle all of the things. You need to be able to prioritize and say alright, these are the things that are critical from a reactive standpoint. And then also, oh, by the way, I’ve observed these other things that are happening, we need to proactively go out and address these things before they actually become a problem later on down the line. And then I have to do a reactive thing. So in ideal world world is like 80% proactive, 20% reactive, but reality is when it’s just a person one, you know, you end up getting all the things you have to really prioritize and learn to say no, the analogy I use in the book is you got to be the bouncer at the nightclub. You have to say no, like, you can’t come in wearing those shoes, my friend, you need to go change and come back.

Adriana Romero
I 100% agree with you. Because you know, we all make that mistake. We I think that enablement has a very specific personality like people that actually thrive in enablement. We like to help people we like to please people with it’s what we do. It’s the nature of the beast. So for us learning how to say no to things is very difficult because it’s like okay, so this person’s gonna think I don’t want to help them or I don’t want to do the job. You’re an engineer as me as john who’s listening to us there’s a lot of engineers out there now enablement which I find very interesting. Never you know, just like you I was I’m a systems engineer, I did not sought out to work in a sales floor. But how how does data how to use data to actually come up with no decision so tell me more about when you tell your customers or when you have done it. You have this list I call it the the Christmas list I want you know, I want everything. You have that list you have the observation That you have done, how do you use the data that spits out of, you know, CRMs or, you know, er, peas or anything else that the company is using to actually define what should come first?

T. Melissa Madian
Yeah, it’s, it’s funny. Because you mentioned, a lot of engineers sort of aren’t going into sales enablement. And I think a lot of it has to do with, you know, process design and problem solving, right? Regardless of the discipline of engineer you’re at, you know how to solve a problem, you know, what identify inputs and actually solve a problem and figure out all the variables and try and figure out various solutions, right? It’s the old like Apollo 13. Movie, when it’s like, we have to figure out how to get this, this thing into this using only these things that I have here. And so data is very much an important part of that. Because quite a lot of the time, you’ll have a sales leader that comes to a person says, We need negotiation training, or we need presentation training, or we need, you know, something training, and my cut at it is, okay, well, that’s cute that you feel that way. But let’s actually take a look at the data and see, do you actually have a negotiation problem? Or do you have a process problem somewhere earlier? That actually, your sales team isn’t actually answering the right questions for the client earlier, which is leading to a negotiation problem. So you can actually take a look at sales process data and sales velocity data to see, you know, is it Are these the requests that I’m getting actually, actually the problem? Or are the symptoms of a problem that actually exists somewhere else over here? And data really helps you apply? You got to be really good friends with your sales off?

Adriana Romero
Oh, totally. That’ll be able to tell you that TV and jam, you know, that’s very important. Yep.

Unknown Speaker
Yeah, I

Adriana Romero
completely agree. I think that most times when and it’s funny, because those are the requests we get as enablers, hey, we need objection handling, we need a competitor battle card. And we need to teach the people to handle the competitor at the you know, stage four of the deal. And you’re like, Okay,

Unknown Speaker
yeah,

Adriana Romero
sit down, let’s calm down. And that’s where you knowing the data and you being proactive and you understanding a lot of things. And sometimes it’s you know, I tell people, sometimes there’s a lot of data, there’s a lot of getting the post on the floor like what are you listening? If we’re not on the floor? Do you have you know, conversation intelligence tool to help you listen to calls, and I invite enablers if you have any type of call recording or call intelligence, carve time of your week to listen to calls, you’re gonna find so many, you know, hints and, and, and areas of improvement of your team that are going to help you have the conversations as you’re saying, Alyssa, right?

T. Melissa Madian
Yep, absolutely. And the good thing is, there are Call Recording softwares. Now that you can do I mean, back in my days, you would have to actually physically listen into the call, because there was no call recording software. But now, it’s a great way for you to assess what what are the words coming out of their mouths? And how, how variant? Is that message across the board? And then also, is there actually a objection handling problem? Or is it something that’s happening earlier in the sales process that needs to be addressed?

Adriana Romero
100%. And I think another thing that is important to to to know, as enablers is the problem can even be a foundational understanding of the problem, the solution, the persona, or the market. Like, if you have people that you know, as we all know, you’re onboarding somebody, they tell you I know how to sell, I’m not going to learn anything new. It’s like, Yeah, but have you sold to this persona in this kind of company with this using this type of solution? It’s important that they really understand that and I like to call it let’s take people to chapter one of the book. Let’s show them how we got to this part of the story. Teach them why the solution exists, and what problem we’re trying to solve, and learn to understand what the other person is trying to tell you. Oh, yes, that’s pretty sure that’s something that you share.

T. Melissa Madian
Yep, absolutely.

Adriana Romero
What’s that? Well, we see another book from you anytime soon.

T. Melissa Madian
Yes, actually, my husband and I match my husband’s a screenwriter and an author. My husband and I are writing another children’s book based on our cat tickle.

Adriana Romero
I love it. So that’s another thing Melissa wrote a book a children’s book which I really love that it was built in a science lab correct. That’s the name Yeah. I my daughter actually loves the character and she loves it the character is quirky and different than you know they they find their place in the world and I think it’s super important to bring this message to to the younger generation to understand because traditional education is not going to bring them to what they might end up doing. So it’s important to like your book is great. JOHN Barris, his book of I want to be in sales when I grow up. I love it. True nerd moment we have done roleplay with my daughter wrote that book, so yes. It happens. Anyway, let’s let’s pivot a little bit into 2021. I saw you were super busy the beginning of the year handling a lot of virtual kickoffs. Yeah. Tell us your experience in managing your you come from doing so many in person. Tell us your experience about handling virtual kickoffs.

T. Melissa Madian
Yeah. So what was interesting, I have a service called ESCO in a box, which is basically producing your live kickoff event. So with the pandemic, I had to pivot really fast into virtual takeoff production, because now folks were doing during the kickoff, the all virtual either zoom or, or through other virtual platforms. And what’s interesting is, the fundamentals of the kickoff, need to stay the same. So the fundamentals of the kickoff are, why are your people there? Why are you bringing them all together? Why are you spending this money? Now, in the case of a virtual kickoff, you’re not spending time and expense, money traveling expense money, you’re spending just time like, Why are you bringing people together to stare at a screen, but the construct the method of delivery had to change because you can’t have were in live takeoff, you have people sitting in a in a conference room and they’re able to interact with one another and they can get up and go get a coffee and a virtual kickoff, you can’t have people sitting in a room for eight hours. It’s just mind numbing. So I had to really coach clients through this idea of you had the old way of thinking, you know, a two or three day live kickoff, can’t be that way anymore. So even if you’ve blocked off a week, you’re not going to go 8am to 5pm every day for this virtual kickoff. And so I would encourage and this is a hard thing to wrap people, like people are gonna have a hard time wrapping their brains around this. But my suggestion for virtual events is it doesn’t have to be a, you know, two, three days, sales kickoff, and all the things happen in that kickoff, and then you go back to your your day to day job, you can actually have sort of a rolling kickoff and have like a little nugget here and have a little nugget there and, and make the flashiness of what a kickoff usually is, have that carried throughout the entire year. And I had like one client think, oh, that’s actually kind of a cool idea. And then a lot of clients just like, No, we need to have the traditional, traditional kickoff in virtual form that’s not going to fly with our management. And I really think like moving into 2021. And even if it’s 2022, I really feel like anyone has to start thinking a bit differently of how kickoffs run. Because what’s the purpose of the purpose of the kickoff just to be splashy and exciting? Well, you can do that in like a 45 minute zoom meeting, it doesn’t have to be, it doesn’t have to be this three day event. If the purpose of the kickoff is to communicate, messaging and deliver training, you can also do that over the course of time, it doesn’t have to be in this tiny little window of activity. So I feel like the virtual is not going to go away anytime soon. And I think as a lot of organizations realize how much more cost effective it was to run a virtual pickup. I feel like it’s going to be around for a while.

Adriana Romero
I 100% agree with you. And I think it goes back to what you’ve said at the beginning of WhY are You doing okay? Yeah.

Unknown Speaker
Why are you doing this?

Adriana Romero
Why? Like, I’ve spoken with some of enablement, friends, and they say, they have asked the question like, are we launching a new product? Do we need a new methodology? Or is this just let’s just bring the spirit up, then we have to do something completely different. But it’s it’s mindsets to change the mentality of what we have traditionally be doing. It’s a very big shift of that status quo of a kickoff is three day Oh, yes. And yes,

T. Melissa Madian
somewhere and somewhere sexy and yeah, we fly everybody in it’s so great for everybody to see each other build culture and it’s like, Okay, do you really need to do is a required?

Adriana Romero
Exactly. And I think that also that, you know, all this, I hope it does a change of mindset of a live event should also have the same questioning, because sitting in a conference room for eight hours in Hawaii, it makes no sense. No boy in Miami or in Barbados, or whatever you do it so I hope that that changes and that people learn that an ESCO should have a meaning to your point, right? Oh, yeah,

T. Melissa Madian
yeah, otherwise what why are you doing it? Why are you bring it in set and spend that money instead on investing in your diversity and inclusion programs, that money instead on charity outreach, like, there’s so many better ways to spend money, like, for me, it’s kickoffs, and don’t get me wrong. I love kickoff, like I love the live kickoff, I love organizing a kickoff I love you know, bringing people enemy energy. But I think what the pandemic has shown me is there’s there’s actually a different way to think about kickoff, that actually in the long term benefit the organization more than This like condensed three days, snazzy sexy,

Adriana Romero
that is so much worse nation so much work, because that’s another thing people, and also in the virtual people think, Oh, it’s gonna be easier because it’s virtual no amount of coordination, I can just I can just imagine all the stuff that you were doing to coordinate times cool logistics, you know, this person live this person, whatever, do we have a recording how much time we’re gonna leave as break? That must have been out logistic kind of you know,

T. Melissa Madian
oh yeah, it was the logistics I had one client that had basically three major time zones but a lot of small time zones like from Asia Pacific all the way through to Pacific Time Zone. Wow. So just coordinating all of those making sure that the majority were joining at a time that was decent. So there was a lot of sitting in my pajamas and bunny slippers with a laptop on my lap. For that kickoff,

Adriana Romero
I remember seeing your pictures of those. It was very good. Well, that’s the advantage of doing a virtual you could be in your house with your

T. Melissa Madian
lecture with a cat. But the cat next to me

Adriana Romero
talking about, you know, changing status quo and changing mindset. You know, you’re working with so many sales leaders and leaders in different companies. And enablement has changed so much in the last year only. Let’s not even think about the last 10 years, just the last year has been such a shift. Where do you see what are kind of like the Melissa’s prediction of where enablement is going to be in 2022?

T. Melissa Madian
Yeah, it’s a great question. And I’ve been saying this for a while. But now I’m starting to see traction on LinkedIn and stuff. It’s not just sales enablement, it’s revenue enablement, it is the entire customer lifecycle. It’s the entire sales experience that needs to be enable all the people touching the customer from the folks in marketing that are interacting with the customer, right through sales, SDR sales to the post sales, implementation, customer success and services organizations, they all need to be singing from the same song sheet, I agree. And an enablement is in a really great position to connect all of those dots. So that from the customer’s perspective, there is a consistent experience across all of the people that are interacting with, with that customer. So I feel like anyone was in a really good position to broaden its reach into all revenue generating and revenue influencing functions and not just sales.

Adriana Romero
I 100% agree with you. And, you know, I’m living it as well, you know, currently I was brought in and I was basically working with the two main sales functions, but I am working so much with marketing, and because I have an incredible marketer that is very aligned with sales, but I started to immediately see, I need to also take under this umbrella, my CS team, because the to your point, the being coherent and what the customer is having, and also understanding where we have gaps. And where we need to fill those gaps that a handoff process is just not only here, here’s a customer and yeah, go is what do we need to give that customer to do many things and, you know, you you have seen it, and you have done a lot of technology adoption, adopting technology, which is what the majority of enablers are doing. They’re enabling a team who are selling any type of sask, you know, software or solution or any other and the majority of them who can be listening. It is much more than just telling them what your solution can solve is helping them with the vision of how you’re going to implement it. Because I always use the car analogy, you can have a Ferrari, but if you don’t know how to drive a stick, you’re not going anywhere.

Unknown Speaker
Yep. Right. Exactly.

Adriana Romero
I love I love seeing that, Melissa, and you know, you you bring so much wisdom and so much experience. There’s so many new enablers, but there’s a lot there’s a very big hype of Canadian companies or companies in Canada looking for enablement. Right. And, you know, there’s a few if anybody who’s listening is interested in a role of enablement. I’m pretty sure Melissa, you have a few people that are looking. I have also some people please connect with Melissa and myself. There’s so many roles opening up in the enablement space in Canada that we’re going to need more enablers. What would be your advice for these people who want to come into enablement and take on their first enablement role?

T. Melissa Madian
That well my first piece of advice is of course,

Unknown Speaker
of course, by the book.

T. Melissa Madian
Shameless plug there. I think the important thing is to not be afraid to learn and also not be afraid to say no, because like you mentioned the the, the general demeanor of somebody going into a name that is I’m going to say yes to everything. Because I want to be helpful. I want to impact

Adriana Romero
Yes, I think we lost Melissa for a moment, but I think that she’s loving back again. There she is. Sorry. You got so excited soon was like there’s a lot of passion in that woman and I need to freeze.

T. Melissa Madian
Zoom. It’s like It’s like a you know, it’s the moon is in the seventh house that zoom decides to crash

Adriana Romero
on me. And I was to all of us don’t even worry about that happens to me all the time.

T. Melissa Madian
So enablers need to be like personal trainers, instead of being the bartender who like, is enviable and wants to give you lots of drinks and is always saying yes to you. And then you end up feeling terrible afterwards, the name of the person, you have to view yourself like that coach like that trainer, which means you’re going to press people and make them really uncomfortable. And you’re going to say no to certain things. But But you’re there to make them better, you’re there to help them lose 30 pounds, you’re there to help them build muscle, you’re there to help them be more successful, work smarter, work faster. So that’s how, instead of being like a people pleaser, like a bartender, try and think of yourself as that personal trainer.

Adriana Romero
I like that. Pressure drives performance. And I think that that’s super important that everybody who is in sales and revenue and customer success, they need to understand that there’s pressures, there’s things we cannot control. But those pressures are the ones that are going to make us better every day. So before we let you go, Melissa, to go play with pickles. Today, I have a couple of questions I wanted to ask you so people get to know you better. Alright, cuz I’m pretty sure you’re a constant learner. Tell us a little bit about what books you’re reading.

T. Melissa Madian
So I’m actually when when I read I try to read fiction, I try to read things that either are fiction or historical. So the last book I read was actually this book here. And this is a shameless plug for my husband. My husband’s book, and synthesis is a collection of by fi and short, short stories, and it’s a collection of sci fi horror and action stories. And it’s, I mean, I’m biased because I’m married to the guy but I would also I’ve been married to him for a long time. So I’m quite happy to tell him with his books. And it’s actually a really if you’re into sci fi, and horror is a really great series of short stories. I also just finished reading a book and I’m, I’m can’t remember the name of it right now. But it’s, it’s based on the series, the AMC series turn Washington spies, and it’s a non fictional account of how the first Americans firing came into the during the American Revolution. And that was a great book I

Adriana Romero
read. Wow, that sounds really amazing. I

Unknown Speaker
love it.

Adriana Romero
Tell me Are your chocolate or a candy person?

T. Melissa Madian
Oh, chocolate.

Adriana Romero
I love everybody to bring here’s chocolate. I love this.

T. Melissa Madian
I mean, I’m not gonna say no to candy. But of course, but

Adriana Romero
you know, good, good Friday chocolate cake. You know, Matilda style. Why not? And what is your biggest pet peeve? Melissa.

T. Melissa Madian
I hate it when my husband does not put the dishes in the dishwasher. On the countertop, or in the same bucket piling up? Yeah, as but the dishwasher. It’s like right there like you you actually know where the dishwasher is, is? Where are you putting the dishes on the countertop? You open that door and it just drives me up the wall. He is an engineer by background. He was like, felt like he doesn’t know how these things work.

Adriana Romero
Household fights of every household. I believe that that happens to all of us. Don’t worry, you’re not alone. No, Melissa, it has been a great pleasure having you here learning from you. Give it getting all your advice. Please tell people how they can reach you.

T. Melissa Madian
Yeah, LinkedIn is the best one. You can find me Melissa madyun or on Instagram or Twitter at Melissa Madden, or my website www dot Melissa Madigan calm. It’s really easy to find me on the interwebs

Adriana Romero
amazing. I love this. I hope you have a chance to enjoy this weekend and it was sunshine, go do some walks. Maybe pickles is in the window and join some vitamin D right now. But everybody who was able to join the live saying thank you so much for spending time with us today. And if you join later, I hope you get some gold nuggets that Melissa shared. Thank you, everybody. Thank you, Melissa. Thanks.

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